Mexican Black Bean Burgers

I made the decision to cleanse my body about six months ago with the main goal of having the best body and health possible to become pregnant. I want to be able to provide my baby with the best in utero care possible.

The reason I started on this detoxifying journey is because I read an article that said children are being born with toxins in their bodies, which obviously comes from the food the mother eats and environment the mother lives in. Put simply, I need to start creating eating and lifestyle habits now that will decrease the amount of toxins in my body. So when I become pregnant I will be giving my baby the best environment possible to grow in.

As a bonus, these habits will follow me after I have my baby to ensure a long-term, healthy lifestyle!

This was no easy task because it’s not just the foods I eat, but also beauty and household products I use. But I started early for a reason and I have made tremendous strides in detoxifying my body. First and foremost, I only eat local and organic foods. I gave up fast food and processed foods, which was the easiest part.

The hardest was coming up with new, delicious foods for snacks and meals.

Two summers ago my partner, Brad, and I discovered Mexican black bean burgers and have made them nonstop ever since. The two of us enjoy a variety of vegetarian meals, so they were always part of my diet before I decided to go completely vegetarian last October.

You can make these burgers in the summer, but they can also be made in the spring, fall, and winter because they are made in a frying pan and not the BBQ. We enjoy them year round! I hope you enjoy them as much as I do, and remember that the recipe is flexible. You can adjust by adding or subtracting several of the ingredients. I don’t always add cilantro and I tend to put in more cumin than the recipe calls for.


Mexican Black Bean Burgers:
Serves 4

3 tsp – Olive oil
1/2c – Thinly sliced scallions (you can substitute for a sm. onion, green onion, or chives.)
2 lg. – Cloves of garlic, finely chopped
1/3c – Chopped poblano chile (optional)
15oz. – Can black beans, rinsed and drained
1/2c – Coarsely chopped, fresh cilantro
1/2c – Whole wheat breadcrumbs
1 lg. – Egg
1/2 tsp – Chile powder
1/2 tsp – Cumin

Heat 1 tbsp of olive oil in skillet over medium heat then add onions, poblano, and garlic. Cook until softened and slightly browned, roughly 1-2min. Transfer to a food processor and add beans, pulse 2-3 times to a rough chop.

You don’t want your beans to be mushy like refried beans, but more of a course chop.

After you have your attained your desired bean-choppiness, transfer to a bowl and gently mix in the cilantro, breadcrumbs, egg, chile powder, cumin, and 3/4 tsp salt. The recipe then calls for you to make patties, refrigerate for at least 30min up to 4hrs, but instead I pack all the ingredients to one side of the bowl and then refrigerate for 30+ minutes. After refrigerating I make patties as I put them in the pan.

I have no idea if this helps or hinders the process, but it works for me.

Finally, cooking time. Heat remaining 2 tbsp of olive oil in skillet at medium heat, place patties on skillet, and cook each side for roughly 2-5 min. Be sure to check the little buggers to make sure they’re not burning. They don’t taste as good that way.

Brad and I eat our black bean burgers on whole-wheat or gluten-free flatbread buns topped with avocado, tomato, baby spinach, cheese, and cucumbers. A personal favourite side dish to these delicious burgers is Brad’s infamous strawberry spinach salad with pecans, and occasionally I enjoy a little Mexican rice.


– written by guest blogger Kates. Follow her on Kates GranolaFacebook and Twitter.

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About the Author

Giselle Baturay is a mother, herbalist, aromatherapist, prenatal and postpartum educator, boutique owner, community builder, gatherer of dreams, task juggler and a lover of life.

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The content of Granola Babies blog and website is for educational purposes and not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease. This information has not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration.